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A freelance writer, writer, artist, geek, hopeless (and hopeful) romantic, and over-thinker. My website: www.fantasywritingschool.com

And just didn’t realize it

Picture by Sam Manns on Unsplash

Compulsory heterosexuality is a very real thing. When I was growing up, being gay or lesbian wasn’t even talked about.

The first time I ever heard the word “gay” was when I was seven years old on the bus to school, when a kid used that word to make fun of me. I asked my parents what “gay” meant when I got home, and they told me it meant “happy.” The next day, when that kid called me gay again, I was completely unbothered by it, thinking it was a compliment. He stopped bothering me after that.

Growing up surrounded…


Elisa & Marcela and Anne Lister & Ann Walker

Elisa and Marcela (Married in Spain, 1901)

Elise and Marcela, photographed by José Sellier Loup

Elisa Sánchez Loriga and Marcela Gracia Ibeas were a Spanish lesbian couple who met at school in A Coruña in the 1880s, where Elisa worked and Marcela was studying. It was not difficult for others to pick up on their immediate chemistry, but same-sex relationships were taboo at the time. Marcela’s parents eventually found out and sent her away from her blossoming romance to a school in Madrid, Spain. They were separated for almost ten long years, never forgetting each other.

After Marcela’s studies were done, she was given a teaching position in Dumbría. Her new home was within walking…


A Bias Opinion Based on The CW TV Series: Spoilers Ahead

Clarke and Lexa: picture from the100.fandom.com

I recently finished watching the final season of The CW series The 100 and, like many others, was not a huge fan of how things ended. It was so disappointing and.. strange.. that if I were to ever re-watch this series, it would only be to once again experience Clarke and Lexa’s too-short love story.

When Lexa died I — along with many others in the LQBTQ+ community — was devastated. Producer Jason Rothenberg said on TV Insider:

“Lexa’s death triggered real emotional trauma for some people … It tapped into the real world, it tapped into their lives, and…


Featuring a picture of myself as a gay child

Picture by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

I’ll preface this article by saying that I’m not against the idea of people “coming out.” Yes, it would be lovely to live in a world without any heteronormativity; where people could feel comfortable saying “I really like this girl at school” nonchalantly instead of timidly saying “I’m a lesbian” after suppressing it for years in fear of a bad reaction or being forced into conversion therapy (which is worryingly still legal in a lot of North America).

Sadly, most of the world is still catching up with even legalizing same-sex marriage (Imagine trying to keep apart two people in…


Part 2 of How I Opened My Print on Demand Store + Shop Optimization, Sales, & More

*Complete part 1 before reading part 2.

Now that you have your design complete and your product prepared, you need a platform to publish it on! In this post I’ll show you how to set up your Etsy shop step-by-step. This includes linking it to your Printify account, optimizing your new shop, editing a listing, creating mockup images, and much more.

Let’s dive right into it!

OPEN AND OPTIMIZE YOUR ETSY SHOP

#1 OPEN YOUR SHOP

Open an Etsy account using your print on demand business e-mail.
On your new account, click “sell on Etsy,” and then “open your Etsy shop.” …


Part 1 of How I Opened an Etsy Shop Using Canva and Printify + SEO, Pricing, & More

Passive income: the holy grail of internet businesspeople.. and for a good reason. For many of us, working a 9–5 in a cubicle with an egotistical boss and a dress code doesn’t sound all that appealing. How much more satisfying does it sound to open an e-commerce shop, write an Ebook or online course, or invest in stocks, and then sit back and watch the money roll in?

A lot.

Yet as easy as influencers say it is to earn $1k, $5k, even $20k, a month, it isn’t.. for the vast majority of us. And once we see that something…


Eh?

Picture by Maxime Doré on Unsplash

Loonies & Toonies

  • A loonie is a 1-dollar coin, its name derived from the image of a loon on the tails side.
  • A toonie is a 2-dollar coin, merging the word “loonie” with the sound of the number “two,” and featuring a polar bear (or three)on the tails side.

Funnily enough, Canadians coined (pun) the term “loonie” themselves shortly after the dollar bill was replaced with coins in 1987, and in Quebec they nicknamed it “huard” (French for “loon”). In 2006, the words “loonie” and “toonie” were trademarked by the Royal Canadian Mint.

Another “fun” Canadian fact is that as…


Interests, Traits, Flaws, and Motives

Image from Cottonbro on Pexels

In part 1 we covered the why of your characters’ personalities, now it’s time to cover the what.

When determining and defining what your character’s personality will be, it may be helpful to already know some things about them to build off of, such as:

  • Their origins, environment, and predispositions/temperament (covered in part 1)
  • Their role in the story, and what traits and personality would best fit that role (the comic relief, side kick, hero, villain, inspiration, guide,..)
  • The character arc or emotional growth journey you want your character to have and how you want them to evolve throughout the…


Origins, Environment, and Predispositions

Picture by Pawel Furman on Unsplash

Time and time again I’ve heard readers complain about the boring “blank slate” protagonist, apparently deliberately designed to be dull so the reader can “put themselves in their position” and “experience the story through them.” On the contrary, this approach tends to bore readers and make them feel less connected to the story; if the main character does not seem real — with their own unique struggles, goals, fears, quirks, and voice — why would the rest of the story?

The same rings true for all the characters in your story, especially the developed ones. For the reader to feel…


By developing self-respect and gaining awareness.

Since more recently in my life, I was the spitting image of an anxiously-attached person: terrified of abandonment, ruminating about everything that could possibly go wrong in my relationships, being both passive and passive-aggressive to avoid conflicts, worrying about minor shifts in tone or abnormally short texts (or worse: no texts), crying often due to hypersensitivity and taking things personally, and having low levels of self-esteem and self-respect. All the while, I craved nothing more than closeness, intimacy, and love.

Like most emotional issues, these patterns began to develop during childhood. I had severe separation anxiety regarding my parents —…

Jenna McRae

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